At the beginning of past yr, Ewoma Ukeleghe’s skincare clinic was busier than it had at any time been.

“We had been totally booked and had significant programs to scale the organization,” remembers the founder of SKNDOCTOR. “But then Covid hit and scheduling after scheduling was cancelled. My appointments went to zero and all of a unexpected my calendar was vacant, which was incredibly terrifying.”

Ukeleghe claims it was a “disruptive” and “confusing” time, but alternatively of panicking, she did what she thinks all superior entrepreneurs do: adapt. “You mourn and make peace with the point lifestyle isn’t heading to be the exact same as it was in advance of – then you hustle and do whatever it usually takes to preserve the organization heading.”

For Ukeleghe, that meant focusing on e-commerce, Zoom consultations and social media marketing and advertising. “I’m incredibly privileged that we thrived,” she claims.

Improvisation and perseverance are what secured the founder her place as a finalist for this year’s Black British Enterprise Awards, for which The Telegraph is a media partner. The occasion, now in its eighth yr, celebrates the achievements of some of the UK’s leading corporate bosses and entrepreneurs.

This year’s finalists have been sharing their challenging-earned organization classes ahead of October’s virtual ceremony, in the hope it could help the future generation.

Vese Aghoghovbia, founder of Philly & Mates, also thinks adaptability is important. 

“People imagine the route is clear-cut, but it’s not,” claims the entrepreneur, whose enterprise specialises in children’s guides, toys and game titles. “I started out thinking I was heading down the publishing route, but I in no way predicted to evolve into other items.

“It’s fantastic to have a eyesight, but versatility and open up-mindedness are what’s essential to enable advancement.”